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“Nickel titanium is not stainless steel…it is not a commodity material,” said Nicola Di Bartolomeo, CEO of Memry. “Nitinol is a unique material that is difficult to melt and to work. Having available the scientific knowledge and engineering expertise that allows us to process the material effectively is critical.” [Source: Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry, August 2010]

Please find here recent media coverage of our company, products and services in the trade media.

Shape Memory Actuators for Automotive Applications

Advanced Materials, March 2008
Francesco Butera, SAES Getters

Shape memory alloys enable development of simple, very compact, reliable actuators that can be integrated into components and structures. Shape memory alloys are metallic materials that demonstrate the ability to return to some previously defined shape or size when subjected to the appropriate thermal procedure. Generally, these materials can be plastically deformed at some relatively low temperature, and upon exposure to some higher temperature, they return to their shape prior to the deformation. Download the entire article.

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Shaping tomorrow’s low-profile, high-performance devices

Medical Design, 10/14/10
Tim Geiser, Vice President, New Product Development, Memry Corp. 

To view the entire article as it appeared online, please visit http://medicaldesign.com/materials/memory-alloy-advancement-adds-stiffness-201010/index.html

Memory alloy advancement adds stiffness to the mix.

Using NiTiCo, a nickel-titanium-cobalt alloy, device makers could design smaller shape memory or superelastic devices such as stents and guidewires that retain their structural integrity under stress, but that enter the body through smaller access sites.

Shape-memory stents made of superelastic nitinol, a nickel-titanium alloy, can be compressed, fed through an artery and restored to their intended shape upon delivery to keep diseased arteries open to blood flow. And superelastic nitinol guidewires, unlike those made from stainless steel, can conform to tortuous vascular spaces without compromising their structure. Yet, despite its profound impact in some medical applications, the alloy remains too flexible for other medical applications…

To view the entire article as it appeared online, please visit http://medicaldesign.com/materials/memory-alloy-advancement-adds-stiffness-201010/index.html

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Memry: The Virtues of Vertical Integration

Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry, Volume 32, No. 8, August 2010
Norbert Sparrow

To view the entire article as it appeared online, please visit  http://www.mddionline.com/article/memry-virtues-vertical-integration

You don’t hear many companies bragging about their vertically integrated operations. In fact, the concept has fallen out of favor, as evidenced by firms rushing to outsource all but their core business activities. Global supplier of nitinol-based products Memry begs to differ. Rallying under the slogan “from melt to market,” the company finds immense value in consolidating processes and controlling its technology.

“Vertical integration is the core of our business model,” said Nicola Di Bartolomeo, CEO of Memry. Di Bartolomeo spoke with EMDT editor Norbert Sparrow at MD&M East in New York.

“Nickel titanium is not stainless steel… it is not a commodity material,” stressed Di Bartolomeo. “Nitinol is a unique material that is difficult to melt and to work. Having available the scientific knowledge and engineering expertise that allows us to process the material effectively is critical,” said Di Bartolomeo.

To view the entire article as it appeared online, please visit  http://www.mddionline.com/article/memry-virtues-vertical-integration

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Five-Minute Interview: Nurturing Nitinol from the C Suite

European Medical Device Design, November 2010
Norbert Sparrow

To view the entire article as it appeared online, please visit
http://www.emdt.co.uk/article/five-minute-interview-nurturing-nitinol-c-suite

EMDT's series of interviews offers personal perspectives on the diverse and dynamic medical device technology industry. Here, we talk to Nicola Di Bartolomeo [CEO of Memry Corp., a global supplier of nitinol-based products].

Q If I wasn’t talking to you right now, what would you be doing?

A Most likely I would be communicating and reaching out in my role as CEO: holding a meeting, answering e-mail or talking on the phone. I need to speak frequently with those responsible for various company functions, so I might be discussing financials with the CFO, reviewing a commercial agreement with sales or evaluating a new equipment purchase with operations.

Q How did you get into the industry?

A I am relatively new to the medical device industry, having taken my current position in 2008. Before that I was a management consultant with a generalist background. I was consulting for the SAES Group when it acquired Memry Corp. in 2008, and I was given the opportunity to join SAES.

To view the entire article as it appeared online, please visit
http://www.emdt.co.uk/article/five-minute-interview-nurturing-nitinol-c-suite

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